math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Forum for the GRE subject test in mathematics.
larry burns
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Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:53 pm

math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby larry burns » Mon Nov 01, 2010 3:06 pm

So about a couple months ago I decided that I wanted to go to grad school. At the time, I was mostly considering physics. But now, I've decided that I want to consider applied math programs as well. The problem is that I registered for the physics GRE, but not the math subject since at the time I didn't think I would go into math. Now, its way too late to register for the math subject.

I know a few programs that don't require the math subject, but they are mostly Computational/Applied math programs. I wanted to go into programs that focused more on the theoretical math, not computational methods. Out of the ones that I've seen, those are all joint pure/applied math programs , and REQUIRE, not just recommend, the math subject GRE. Are there any good programs out there that don't require it? So far, I've only seen Maryland's and NYU's math programs don't require it

Chapel
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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:25 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby Chapel » Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:20 pm

University of Nebraska at Lincoln doesn't require it. I have a friend who goes there and shoe opted to apply to "non-GRE" schools after getting her result on the test.

MattW
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Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:34 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby MattW » Mon Nov 01, 2010 9:05 pm

I know that Stony Brook and University of U North Carolina don't require them.

You could also consider looking into some Canadian schools - they don't require the GRE at all.
U Toronto, U Waterloo, McGill, and U British Columbia all offer strong math programs.
A note on Canadian Universities: its highly unusual to get accepted into a phd program from a bachelors,
but don't worry: they pay for your masters. I personally think this is a better system.

larry burns
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Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:53 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby larry burns » Mon Dec 06, 2010 3:14 am

MattW wrote:I know that Stony Brook and University of U North Carolina don't require them.

You could also consider looking into some Canadian schools - they don't require the GRE at all.
U Toronto, U Waterloo, McGill, and U British Columbia all offer strong math programs.
A note on Canadian Universities: its highly unusual to get accepted into a phd program from a bachelors,
but don't worry: they pay for your masters. I personally think this is a better system.


so you can get your MS there but then re-apply to phD programs in the US?

Also, since I can't take the math subject GRE, if I were to accepted into the top math programs as an MS instead of phD student, is it likely that I could get admitted into the phD program the following year if I did well in the math courses that first year?

JodoYodo
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Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:51 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby JodoYodo » Mon Dec 06, 2010 7:44 pm

For Canadian universities you can enter a Masters program and then apply for a PhD program in the States. Many Canadians do this. An alternative is you can be inducted into a Masters program, but then switch into a PhD program at that Canadian university. I know a few people who have done this but generally you need to be exceptional.

larry burns
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:53 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby larry burns » Tue Dec 07, 2010 12:56 am

JodoYodo wrote:For Canadian universities you can enter a Masters program and then apply for a PhD program in the States. Many Canadians do this. An alternative is you can be inducted into a Masters program, but then switch into a PhD program at that Canadian university. I know a few people who have done this but generally you need to be exceptional.


1. Do you have to be really exceptional to enter the MS in Canada but then do your phD in the US?
2. Also, if I get my MS in Canada but then apply to phD programs in the US, do I have to take classes and the comprehensive exam at the phD program in the US? Or will I just go straight into the phD research?
3. If I get my MS in canada but then apply for phD in US, will I be considered a domestic or foreign applicant? If I'll be considered foreign, then having to get nearly a perfect score for the math GRE to apply to US phD programs won't be fun..
4. How much easier is it to get into canada MS programs compared to US phD programs?

JodoYodo
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Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:51 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby JodoYodo » Tue Dec 07, 2010 6:17 pm

I can't profess to being an expert since I am applying for my PhD this year as well, however, since I am Canadian I am also applying to the Masters program at Waterloo (which is most likely what I'm going to go into).

1. I assume that if you applied for a PhD in the US you'd be more attractive than a fresh undergraduate since you'll have done proven research and already written a thesis.
2. All of those PhD exams and classes will have to be in the US.
3. You will probably be a domestic applicant.
4. I can only speak for myself as a Canadian, but it's way easier for me to get into a Canadian MS program than a US PhD program, and that's probably in general too. Waterloo, Toronto, McGill, UBC, and Simon Frasier are all great schools but there is a lack of applicants to them because they're not American.

alex
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Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 12:54 am

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby alex » Tue Dec 07, 2010 7:24 pm

Hey, how is Dalhousie? I applied there as a wild card (rest were american universities) because I really dig the idea of living in Halifax for some reason and because it fit what I was looking for in terms of research areas and size and everything. Plus, their website has a picture of a math pizza party going on so who was I to resist that.

Seriously though, I applied but I don't really have many details on the school as far as reputation goes. Anyone have anything they can share?

MattW
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:34 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby MattW » Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:14 am

larry burns wrote:1. Do you have to be really exceptional to enter the MS in Canada but then do your phD in the US?
2. Also, if I get my MS in Canada but then apply to phD programs in the US, do I have to take classes and the comprehensive exam at the phD program in the US? Or will I just go straight into the phD research?
3. If I get my MS in canada but then apply for phD in US, will I be considered a domestic or foreign applicant? If I'll be considered foreign, then having to get nearly a perfect score for the math GRE to apply to US phD programs won't be fun..
4. How much easier is it to get into canada MS programs compared to US phD programs?


Here's my opinions:
1. I don't think so. I think that for a lot of people a master's degree strengthens their profile, especially if the school you come from is not well known (like mine).
2. You'll probably have to do comprehensive exams, but you don't need to redo the basic courses.
3. I'd think that you'd be considered a domestic student. I have a US citizenship, so I'm hoping that makes me count as a domestic student. I hadn't thought of this.
4. Its comparable in difficulty from my understanding.

Also if you're looking to transfer from a masters to phd program, it depends which school you go to. Some schools like to fast track their masters students into the phd program after one year if they're doing well, but others like their students to finish their master's first.

MattW
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 6:34 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby MattW » Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:20 am

alex wrote:Hey, how is Dalhousie? I applied there as a wild card (rest were american universities) because I really dig the idea of living in Halifax for some reason and because it fit what I was looking for in terms of research areas and size and everything. Plus, their website has a picture of a math pizza party going on so who was I to resist that.

Seriously though, I applied but I don't really have many details on the school as far as reputation goes. Anyone have anything they can share?


From my understanding, its considered a decent school for math, probably just below the four I mentioned before. Unfortunately its probably not well known outside of Canada. Its a small department, this can be taken as a good or bad thing. I personally want to go somewhere with a large department so that I can have my choice of courses.

larry burns
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:53 pm

Re: math programs that DON'T required the math subject GRE?

Postby larry burns » Fri Dec 10, 2010 2:28 pm

well I just heard from some professors at my school (a top state school), that the answers to my questions are
1. US phD admissions don't favor those with an MS from Canada
3. Domestic

so since I want to do my PhD in the US, it seems pointless to do my MS in Canada. I may as well just wait another year to apply instead. Possibly use that year to take more math classes that I lack




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